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Chosen for frozen: Researcher awarded for food-freezing technology

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By Jenni Spinner+

08-Aug-2014

Juming Tang has landed an award for his food-freezing research from the Frozen Food Foundation.
Juming Tang has landed an award for his food-freezing research from the Frozen Food Foundation.

The Frozen Food Foundation has saluted a Washington State food scientist with its fifth annual Freezing Research Award for advancing technology in the field.

Juming Tang, a scientist based at Washington State University, has been saluted for his work by the foundation (part of the American Frozen Food Institute), in a presentation during the annual International Association for Food Protection (IAFP) meeting.

Excellence down cold

According to foundation president Kraig Naasz, Tang was tapped for his work in food processing engineering, specifically development of in-package microwave pasteurization for controlling pathogens of frozen/chilled meals.

Dr. Tang’s contributions to the field of food science and engineering have aided the scientific community and consumers alike by demonstrating innovation through increased product quality, safety and shelf life,” Naasz said.

Tang’s food science career spans across more than two decades of work on food engineering and safety. His achievements include coming up with single-mode, microwave-assisted sterilization, and microwave-assisted pasteurization.

Industry achievements

In addition to the Frozen Food Foundation recognition, Tang earned the Research and Development Award from the Institute of Food Technologists in 2010. He also received the International Food Engineering Award from the American Society of Agricultural and Biomechanical Engineers (ASABE) and Nestlé.

Since beginning his career, he has trained hundreds of burgeoning scientists and engineers from several international food and packaging companies.

Dr. Tang is committed to bridging scientific findings to create engineering developments for industrial applications,” said Ralph Cavalieri, Tang’s colleague at Washington State University. “I have no doubt Dr. Tang will continue to make great contributions to the advancement of modern technologies for food safety to benefit the frozen food industry and society in general.

The Frozen Food Foundation recognition comes with a $2,000 honorarium and a commemorative plaque.

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1 comment

Microwaving foods....destroys its nutrient value ?

Perhaps I maybe mistaken, but I learned that micro wave molecular vibration of the food ( its very rapid thermal agitation), leads to the destruction of valuable nutrients, Vitamins ? Microwaved food is rather like consuming / eating colored cardboard ?

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Posted by Dean L
08 August 2014 | 20h16

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