SUBSCRIBE

Breaking News on Food and Beverage Processing and PackagingWorldUSEurope

Read more breaking news

 

 
Loading...
IFT 2014

Continental Carbonic freezes food contaminants with dry ice

By Jenni Spinner+

10-Jul-2014
Last updated on 10-Jul-2014 at 01:51 GMT

By eliminating water from the cleaning process, the company's dry-ice blasting technology avoids downtime and reduces the risk of harmful bacterial growth.

Continental Carbonic, a provider of dry ice equipment, offers technology using dry ice to blast away debris and contaminants from food processing equipment. Suited for baking operations and other food production applications, the method takes pelletized pieces of dry ice (chilled to -109 degrees F) and uses high-pressure air to accelerate the pellets into food equipment surfaces.

Steve Sullivan, director of sales for Continental Carbonic, told FoodProductionDaily the dry-ice blasting freezes the contaminants at a rate faster than the equipment or machinery they are adhered to.

"It’s like freezing bubble gum—it doesn’t get sticky anymore, and it loses its adhesive qualities," he said. "The nice thing with dry ice is when it freezes whatever the contaminant is (be it baking grease or any kind of powder, or ingredients from baking), it will fall to the floor; there’s nothing left over except what you’re trying to clean.

One key advantage to the use of dry ice to clean food equipment, Sullivan said, is the absence of water.

"Water is the enemy of any kind of plant where you’ve got food," he said. "Water promotes bacterial growth—E. coli, Salmonella, mold; with this product, it eliminates the introduction of water."

Additionally, Sullivan told FPD, dry-ice blasting can be performed on the plant floor, while the equipment is hot.

"In a lot of cleaning applications you’ve got to cool the equipment down completely, disassemble it, take it out, clean it, put it back together and heat it up," he said. "With dry ice blasting, you can keep the equipment hot and in place."

In fact, Sullivan said, the dry-ice blasting works best if the equipment is kept hot. The discrepancy in cooking or baking temperature and the sub-zero temperature of the dry ice creates a thermal shock effect that causes contaminants to break away and fall to the floor.

The dry-ice blasting technique reportedly requires little training, and only some basic personal protective equipment (safety goggles, ear plugs, etc.).

Sullivan spoke to FPD at IFT 2014, the recent conference and exposition focused on food safety, processing, ingredients, and packaging.

Related products

Nutrition Facts panel: Snack impact?

How will Nutrition Facts panel changes hit snacks?

Snack makers and suppliers will be under pressure to make fast changes across all...

‘Pouch slouch’ to poor quality glass: PMMI Beverage Packaging report

‘Pouch slouch’, premium appeal and poor quality glass: PMMI 2014 Beverage Packaging report

In this exclusive video shot at Pack Expo in Chicago we canter through PMMI’s...

Package R&D: Dow applies chemistry, physics, sensory science to design

Packaging R&D: Dow's Pack Studios unites chemistry, physics, sensory science and psychology to optimize package development

Holly Dunnill

Associate research and development director – food and specialty packaging...

Continental Carbonic freezes food contaminants with dry ice

Steve Sullivan

Director of sales, Continental Carbonic

Hood: Sky’s the limit with aseptic beverage packaging

Pete Spanedda

Vice president of dales, HP Hood

Bürkert Online Analysis System ORP micro-organisms

Bürkert: ORP can detect micro-organisms leading to food outbreaks

Bürkert will monitor and control PH, chlorine, conductivity, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and turbidity...

Bürkert FloWave dairy industry

Bürkert FloWave starts field tests in the dairy industry

Bürkert FloWave, which measures the flow of a liquid in a pipe, is being...

Bosch Interpack 2014 hygenic design

Bosch: Interpack top trends

Martin Dupick, global product manager, Bosch Packaging Technology, spoke to FoodProductionDaily about the top...

 Digital direct printing: Krones sees a bright beverage future

‘Digital direct printing has a bright beverage future, when ink prices fall’: Krones

Krones explains that digital direct printing removes the need for labels and unlocks limitless...

Rexam targets dairy drinks with cans after MIO success

Rexam targets dairy drinks with cans after MIO success

Rexam tells BeverageDaily.com it is pursuing business in the dairy drinks segment and says...

Graphic Packaging: Soft drinks brands can cut glass breakage, Tite-Pak

Graphic Packaging: Soft drinks brands can cut glass breakage with Tite-Pak

In late 2013 US beer brand Yuengling started shipping bottles in Tite-Pak, a solid...

Functional fancy…Tetra Pak US CEO targets high-value beverage growth

Functional fancy…Tetra Pak US CEO targets high-value beverage growth

Tetra Pak’s new CEO and president for USA and Canada tells BeverageDaily.com that the...

food packaging, business, women

How to be a successful woman in the packaging industry

Passion, determination and ambition: all top tips for aspiring businesswomen, say three senior Swedish...

Americk Packaging Group hires CEO Christopher Hart

Americk CEO: ‘High label quality is critical’

Patrick Doran, director and owner, Americk Packaging Group, hired former Coveris MD Christopher Hart...

INCPEN expands its Fresher for Longer campaign

INCPEN expands its Fresher for Longer campaign

INCPEN (The Industry Council for research on Packaging & the Environment) is expanding its...

Nestlé Africa modular factories

Exclusive: Nestlé on why Africa will be its focus for modular factories

In an exclusive interview with FoodProductionDaily, Alfredo Fenollosa, technical head, Nestlé Asia, Oceania and...

Encore Packaging Solutions

Encore’s Laura Croisdale ‘climbs every mountain’

In the first of a series of podcasts called ‘lunch time bites’, FoodProductionDaily catches...

Sollich talks chocolate: Africa catch-up, Asia and South America boom

Sollich talks chocolate: Africa plays catch-up, Asia and South America boom

Africa’s chocolate market remains a little behind but Asia and South America are booming,...